Sports Medicine

Concussions

 

  

 

 We provide comprehensive concussion care. Our team works closely with schools and specialist to provide the best care for your child. Not every concussion is the same, we will create a plan of care specific to your child’s needs.    


When to Seek Emergency Care
If your child or teen displays any of the following symptoms, seek immediate medical care at an emergency department near you:
•    Unconsciousness for any length of time
•    Changes in alertness
•    Convulsions or seizures
•    Muscle weakness on one or both sides
•    Persistent confusion
•    Repeated vomiting
•    Unequal pupils
•    Unusual eye movements
•    Walking problems.

What is a Concussion?

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury that can be caused by a direct blow to the head or body, or by a whip-lash type motion. Concussions result from the brain moving rapidly and hitting the inside of the skull causing damage to the brain cells and chemical changes within the brain. Concussions can affect sleep patterns, cognition, energy levels, eye function, balance and mood. To help the brain heal activities, both mental and physical, that aggravate or bring on symptoms should be avoided.


Effects of Concussion on Academics

    Concussion symptoms vary widely from one student to another. Even though a may look fine on the outside these symptoms affect functioning throughout the body. Decreased energy demands in the brain are required rot make a full recover, and often a full school day or work load will prolong the recovery and worsen symptoms. It is vital in the days and weeks following a concussion, as part of the treatment process, that modifications and sometimes adjustments to a student’s curriculum and work load are made if necessary.
  
Concussion management is a team approach which requires the combined efforts of the student, parents, teachers, healthcare providers and school administrators. The team approach aims to aide and improve the progression of recovery for the student in order to reduce the amount of class time and class work missed.  


Effects of Concussion on Athletics

After cognitive rest although concussion symptoms may go away the brain may not be fully healed. The purpose of the return to play protocol is to increase your child’s physical activity level and heart rate to ensure concussion symptoms do not return and the brain is fully healed. Physical activity can increase the intra cranial pressure and make symptoms worse. Letting a concussed child return to physical activity before they are ready increases the risk for further or re-injury and prolonged concussion symptoms. The return to play protocol is designed to safely return a child to their normal activities on the playground, at home and in sports.
 
What are the different types of concussion symptoms?

There are many symptoms that can affect a student’s ability to learn. Modifications are suggested to specifically treat each individual student’s needs.  A student will typically fall into one or more of the categories briefly described below.
 
Cognitive/Fatigue
Decreased concentration, increased distractibility, difficulty learning and retaining new information, decreased multi-tasking, and marked fatigue by the end of the day
These symptoms will make it difficult for a student to keep up with school work and curriculum resulting in lower testing
 
Post Traumatic Migraine
Headaches, nausea, sensitivity to light and sound
These symptoms may make it difficult for a student to sit in a noisy classroom, or look at a computer, tablet or projector.
 
Ocular Dysfunctions
Movement of the eyes together is affected resulting in difficulty in bringing eye together to focus on and track an object.
This can affect a student’s ability to read and take notes
 
Vestibular
Impairments in balance centers of your brain affect the ability to interpret motion, coordinate head and eye movements, or stabilize vision upon head movement.
The student is more likely to become car sick from bus rides
 
Anxiety/mood
Difficulty with turning off worrisome thoughts, being particularly ruminative, thoughts of sadness, depression or change in mood
 
Cervicogenic Headache
Headache generated from injury to muscles of the ne
We provide comprehensive concussion care. Our team works closely with schools and specialist to provide the best care for your child. Not every concussion is the same, we will create a plan of care specific to your child’s needs.    


When to Seek Emergency Care
If your child or teen displays any of the following symptoms, seek immediate medical care at an  emergency department  near you:
•    Unconsciousness for any length of time
•    Changes in alertness
•    Convulsions or seizures
•    Muscle weakness on one or both sides
•    Persistent confusion
•    Repeated vomiting
•    Unequal pupils
•    Unusual eye movements
•    Walking problems.


What is a Concussion?

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury that can be caused by a direct blow to the head or body, or by a whip-lash type motion. Concussions result from the brain moving rapidly and hitting the inside of the skull causing damage to the brain cells and chemical changes within the brain. Concussions can affect sleep patterns, cognition, energy levels, eye function, balance and mood. To help the brain heal activities, both mental and physical, that aggravate or bring on symptoms should be avoided.


Effects of Concussion on Academics

Concussion symptoms vary widely from one student to another. Even though a may look fine on the outside these symptoms affect functioning throughout the body. Decreased energy demands in the brain are required rot make a full recover, and often a full school day or work load will prolong the recovery and worsen symptoms. It is vital in the days and weeks following a concussion, as part of the treatment process, that modifications and sometimes adjustments to a student’s curriculum and work load are made if necessary.
  
Concussion management is a team approach which requires the combined efforts of the student, parents, teachers, healthcare providers and school administrators. The team approach aims to aide and improve the progression of recovery for the student in order to reduce the amount of class time and class work missed.  


Effects of Concussion on Athletics

After cognitive rest although concussion symptoms may go away the brain may not be fully healed. The purpose of the return to play protocol is to increase your child’s physical activity level and heart rate to ensure concussion symptoms do not return and the brain is fully healed. Physical activity can increase the intra cranial pressure and make symptoms worse. Letting a concussed child return to physical activity before they are ready increases the risk for further or re-injury and prolonged concussion symptoms. The return to play protocol is designed to safely return a child to their normal activities on the playground, at home and in sports.
 
What are the different types of concussion symptoms?

There are many symptoms that can affect a student’s ability to learn. Modifications are suggested to specifically treat each individual student’s needs.  A student will typically fall into one or more of the categories briefly described below.
 
Cognitive/Fatigue
Decreased concentration, increased distractibility, difficulty learning and retaining new information, decreased multi-tasking, and marked fatigue by the end of the day
These symptoms will make it difficult for a student to keep up with school work and curriculum resulting in lower testing

 
Post Traumatic Migraine
 Headaches, nausea, sensitivity to light and sound
These symptoms may make it difficult for a student to sit in a noisy classroom, or look at a computer, tablet or projector.
 
 
Ocular Dysfunctions
Movement of the eyes together is affected resulting in difficulty in bringing eye together to focus on and track an object.
This can affect a student’s ability to read and take notes

 
Vestibular
Impairments in balance centers of your brain affect the ability to interpret motion, coordinate head and eye movements, or stabilize vision upon head movement.
The student is more likely to become car sick from bus rides

 
Anxiety/mood
Difficulty with turning off worrisome thoughts, being particularly ruminative, thoughts of sadness, depression or change in mood
 
Cervicogenic Headache
Headache generated from injury to muscles of the neck
 

Select from over 100 symptoms to learn about managing your child's illness.