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Resources

Is Your Child Sick?TM


Motion Sickness

Is this your child's symptom?

  • Symptoms triggered by a spinning, rocking or rolling motions
  • The main symptoms are dizziness and nausea

Symptoms of Motion Sickness

  • Dizziness and unsteady walking
  • Nausea and vomiting are also common
  • Before age 6, the main symptom is dizziness and the need to lie down.
  • After age 12, the main symptom is nausea (feeling sick to the stomach).

Causes of Motion Sickness

  • Symptoms are mainly triggered by motion. Sea sickness or amusement park sickness are the most common types. Fun-park rides that spin or whirl are some of the main causes. The Tilt-a-whirl is a good example of a ride to avoid. Also seen during travel by train, aircraft and even car.
  • The cause is a sensitive center in the inner ear. This center helps to maintain balance.
  • As a car passenger driving on winding roads, 25% of people will have symptoms. Under extreme conditions (e.g., high seas) over 90% of people have symptoms.
  • Strongly genetic: If one parent has it, 50% of the children will have it.
  • It is not related to emotional problems. The child cannot control it with will power.
  • Motion sickness symptoms are often worse in children.

When to Call for Motion Sickness

Call Doctor Now or Go to ER

  • Your child looks or acts very sick
  • You think your child needs to be seen, and the problem is urgent

Call Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • Motion sickness symptoms last more than 8 hours
  • You think your child needs to be seen, but the problem is not urgent

Call Doctor During Office Hours

  • You have other questions or concerns

Self Care at Home

  • Motion sickness symptoms

Call Doctor Now or Go to ER

  • Your child looks or acts very sick
  • You think your child needs to be seen, and the problem is urgent

Call Doctor Within 24 Hours

  • Motion sickness symptoms last more than 8 hours
  • You think your child needs to be seen, but the problem is not urgent

Call Doctor During Office Hours

  • You have other questions or concerns

Self Care at Home

  • Motion sickness symptoms

Care Advice for Motion Sickness

  1. What You Should Know About Motion Sickness:
    • Motion sickness is a common normal reaction that occurs in 25% of people.
    • Caused by increased sensitivity of the inner ear.
    • It is not related to emotional problems or any physical disease.
    • In the future, take a special medicine ahead of time to prevent it.
    • Here is some care advice that should help.
  2. Rest - Lie Down:
    • Have your child lie down and rest. If your child goes to sleep, all the better.
  3. Fluids - Offer Sips:
    • Give only sips of clear fluids. Water is best. Do this until the stomach settles down.
  4. Vomiting:
    • Prepare for vomiting. Keep a vomiting pan handy.
    • Usually, children don't vomit more than once with motion sickness.
  5. What to Expect:
    • All symptoms of motion sickness usually go away in 4 hours after stopping the motion.
    • As for the future, people usually don't outgrow motion sickness. Sometimes, it becomes less severe in adults.
  6. Motion Sickness Medicine - Prevention:
    • Buy some dimenhydrinate tablets (such as Dramamine) at your drug store. No prescription is needed. In the future, give it to prevent motion sickness.
    • They come in 50 mg chewable tablets or 15 mg-per-teaspoon liquid.
    • Dosage:
    • Age 2 to 6 years old: 1 teaspoon (5 ml)
    • Age 6 to 12 years old: 1 tablet
    • Age 12 years and older: 2 tablets
    • Give the medicine 1 hour before traveling or going to a fun-park.
    • The tablets give 6 hours of protection and are very helpful.
    • Benadryl can also be used to prevent motion sickness. Use this if you do not have any Dramamine.
  7. Prevention Tips for Car Trips:
    • If your child is over 12 years old, sit him in the front seat.
    • Before age 12, have your child sit in the middle back seat. This should help him look out the front window.
    • Have your child look out the front window, not the side one.
    • Discourage looking at books or movies during car travel.
    • Keep a window cracked to provide fresh air.
    • Avoid exhaust fumes from other vehicles.
    • Meals: Have your child eat light meals before trips. Some children can just tolerate crackers and water.
    • Plastic Bags: Always carry a ziplock plastic bag for vomiting emergencies.
  8. Wrist Bands - Prevention:
    • Acupressure bands (such as Sea-Bands) are helpful for some adults.
    • There is no reason they shouldn't work for some children.
    • Put them on before car trips or other causes of motion sickness.
    • The pressure button goes over the center of the wrist. Place ½ inch (1 cm) above the wrist crease.
  9. Call Your Doctor If:
    • Any symptoms last over 8 hours
    • You think your child needs to be seen
    • Your child becomes worse

And remember, contact your doctor if your child develops any of the 'Call Your Doctor' symptoms.

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. It is provided for educational purposes only. You assume full responsibility for how you choose to use this information.


Copyright 1994-2017 Schmitt Pediatric Guidelines LLC. All rights reserved.

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